Photography

  • How Do You Store Your Pictures?

    Photographed twenty years ago on Fujichrome film with a Nikonos V camera. Photographed twenty years ago on Fujichrome film with a Nikonos V  camera, digitally scanned and properly stored.

    We spend a fortune travelling across the world to distant diving destinations, recording marvellous images of the marine life we come across. Some of the pictures are irreplaceable.

    In the days of film, when pictures were stored as hard copy, it was easily understood that resulting colour transparencies needed to be stored in a cool dark place with low humidity so that they neither faded nor suffered the onslaught of damp conditions.

    Today, we take thousands more pictures than ever because there is no longer a cost consideration associated with the number of exposures made. Not only that, but the ease with which anyone can achieve satisfying results means that anyone can and will take pictures. Ordinary life has almost become one big photographic shoot-out!

    However, this might become the age of lost pictures. While Lartigue’s collection of photographs were later stumbled across in an attic, how many digital photographs will be conserved in the same way? Digital images are merely a collection of magnetic signals until they are realised on a computer.

    Firstly, you need to store your images in a safe way. Leaving them on the hard drive of your computer is asking for trouble. Computers don’t last forever. Install a new operating system and you risk losing data. You might opt for an off-board hard drive or ‘the cloud’. The cloud is simply someone else’s big computer elsewhere.

    Either way, that’s not enough. You need to back up on to a separate hard drive and if you want to be really safe, you should also back up on to a third hard drive at a different location. Then you must stay alert for new technology replacing what you’re using.

    When I first went over to digital photography, I was concerned to archive my pictures in a secure way. Younger techno-bores in those days told me to save them to CD or DVD. They told me they were guaranteed to last ten years. Ten years? That’s not archival permanence!

    IMG_0604

    If you want to preserve the memories of some of your diving exploits so that you can browse them and reminisce years later, I suggest you take your best shots from each dive trip and construct an analogue book using one of the proprietary programs and services available (iPhoto allows you to do this, for example). You can later take it down  from a book shelf at a moment’s notice.

    These books are beautifully printed and bound and can be organised on your computer in an evening.

    As for you videos, first you must edit them down to a digestible length, using only the best moments of the action you have recorded. If you are using a GoPro camera, there’s a free app (GoPro Studio) from GoPro.com that is easily downloaded and simple to use to do that.

    Then you will have the problem of storage. Luckily, hard drives with several terabytes of space (one terabyte is more than a thousand gigabytes) don’t cost that much nowadays although be aware that the connections to your current computer might change and someone might come up with better technology to replace it. It’s the price we pay for the rapid evolution of this technology.

1 Item(s)