Rhinopias

  • The Amazing Rhinopias

    _DSC8312 Rhinpoias Aphanes or Lacy Scorpionfish
    The Lacy Scorpion fish or Rhinopias Aphanes is found in the waters of Papua New Guinea and West Papua. Unlike a lot of colourful marine life, you don't need a macro set-up to get good pictures if you come across one because they can be up to 25cm in length. They are a benthic species in that they tend to rest on things rather than swim. However they often get about by hopping around on their pelvic and pectoral fins. Despite they fact that they appears to be very colourful in these photographs they are masters of disguise and although they often pose precociously atop sponges and coral heads, you can easily pass one by because under natural daylight they are quite hard to see. They were first brought to the attention of marine scientists by British/Australian diving pioneer Bob Halstead who after a career as a schoolmaster took to running scuba diving expeditions and later skippering his boat mv.Telita, taking divers on scuba diving charters around the waters of the Coral Sea, embarking his passengers at Port Moresby. Among other things, Bob Halstead has written several books on diving around PNG.
    Lacy Sorpionfish or Rhinopias Lacy Scorpionfish or Rhinopias Eschmeyeri
    After he started noticing these flamboyant fishes he sent some pictures that he'd taken to experts at the Natural History Museum in London who confirmed it was a previously undescribed species. In fact there are several sub-species. Bob is known for his insightful analysis of diving practises and also for his humour. One of his most well-remembered quotes is: "If you can't take a joke, don't take up underwater photography!" The first time I visited PNG I made it my business to photograph some examples of this keynote fish but after a lot of searching and no luck came back with an article for UK's Diver Magazine entitled 'The Rhinopias is Missing!' I kept my sense of humour. The next time I stayed at the Loloata, a resort on its own island in Bootless Bay run by Australian Dik Knight, the dive guides made it a matter of honour that they did not fail to find me an example to photograph. They took me to a reef called Dinah's Delight, named after Bob Halstead's first wife, also an accomplished scuba diver in her own right and it was if all the Rhinopias in various different sub-species had come out on parade. _DSC8421   To photograph these wonderful looking fish you need a a wide-angle lens so that you can get as close as possible and an underwater flashgun or strobe so that you can reveal them in their full spectrum of colour. The other things you will certainly ned is a pair of sharp eyes and a lot of patience whilst looking for them because in natural daylight they easily merge with their background.._DSC8406 One last point: Rhinopias are said to be the Holy Grail of marine aquarists who like nothing better than to keep one in an aquarium because these delicately coloured fishes are so pretty. Let's keep them in the ocean where they belong. (The pictures here were all taken with fish-eye lenses behind dome ports and with ancillary off-camera flashguns.)

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